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FREE 2nd Thursday Every Month

7:00 p.m.
Armory Center for the Arts
145 North Raymond Ave.
Pasadena, California 91103

Conscientious Projector to Screen Aluna for the Old Pasadena Film Festival

June 16, 2015

Join us for the stirring documentary AlunaMV5BMjE3MDczMzIwMV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNzY1NDExOQ@@._V1_SY317_CR3,0,214,317_AL_ (translated as “the mind inside nature”), this month’s Conscientious Projector feature screening on Thursday, July 9, 7:00 p.m. at Armory Center for the Arts as part of the Old Pasadena Film Festival.  In 1990, noted British author, historian and filmmaker Alan Ereira’s classic BBC documentary From the Heart of the World: The Elder Brothers’ Warning was first broadcast. It brought global attention to the centuries-old indigenous Kogi tribe, an ancient “lost” Colombian civilization previously unknown to the rest of the world, who saw themselves as guardians of the earth. Their emergence came with a warning that their “younger brother,” the people of the modern world, are destroying the planet’s ecosystems through their plundering of nature. In recent years, Ereira returned to the Kogi to document their renewed call for humanity to recognize the interconnectedness of all life, a message they brought to New York City in their first venture into the “civilized” world. The result is Aluna.

A community discussion follows. The Armory is located at 145 N. Raymond in Old Pasadena. Admission is free and the facility is accessible to disabled persons.

It’s a Cowspiracy: How Animal Agriculture Drives Climate Change

May 15, 2015

1416516086448What poses the biggest threat to Earth’s life-giving systems? According to Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret, Conscientious Projector’s film for Thursday, June 11, at 7:00 p.m., the leading cause of global climate change is not fossil fuels, but meat, a.k.a. the animal agriculture industry. Releasing 51% of all greenhouse gas emissions, the production of meat for human consumption is the world’s largest driver of rainforest destruction, water depletion, species extinction, habitat loss, topsoil erosion, ocean dead zones and virtually every other environmental ill. That corporate media has largely failed to report this should come as no surprise, but the film also challenges the environmental movement for its silence on the subject. Filmmakers Kip Anderson and Keegan Kuhn show no such hesitation, whether confronting reluctant mainstream environmentalists and industry defenders, or suggesting a global shift to a more plant-based diet as a means for humans to live healthier and cool our overheated plane.

The film will be shown at Armory Center for the Arts.  NOTE: The film contains brief but graphic images that may be inappropriate for viewing by young children.

Yvonne LeGrice of Vegan Outreach leads a community discussion following the film, which is being shown through the generous assistance of the advocacy group VegFund, supporting vegan activism. Arrive early to sample some delicious vegan munchables. The Armory is located at 145 N. Raymond in Old Pasadena. Admission is free and the facility is accessible to disabled persons.

Conscientious Projector for May, 2015: The Impact of Overpopulation on Planet Earth

April 17, 2015
MV5BMjcxMjU5MDAwOV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNDkyMjIzOA@@._V1_SY317_CR2,0,214,317_AL_This month’s Conscientious Projector feature documentary, Mother: Caring for 7 Billionbrings to light an issue that silently fuels our most pressing environmental, economic, humanitarian and social crises–global population growth. The groundbreaking, award-winning film screens on Thursday, May 14, 7:00 p.m. at Armory Center for the Arts.

Filmmaker Christophe Fauchére and a bevy of international experts and scientists examine the doubling of the number of people on Earth in the past 50 years and boldly address the reluctance of governments and societies to confront the problem due to its polarizing attendant factors of religion, economics, overconsumption, family planning and gender equality. Paul Erlich, author of the classic The Population Bomb and one of the film’s participants, has said, “Mother is a beautifully crafted and unique film that dispels the myths from business leaders and government that we can grow forever.”

 

A community discussion follows the film. The Armory is located at 145 N. Raymond in Old Pasadena. Admission is free and the facility is accessible to disabled persons.

The Human Cost of Fracking

March 16, 2015

Groundswell RisingOn Thursday, April 9 at 7:00 p.m., Conscientious Projector joins the national conversation and protest over the tragic damage to people and the environment caused by hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, with a screening of the new documentary Groundswell Rising: Protecting Our Children’s Air and WaterThe Resolution Pictures feature by the veteran producing-directing team of brothers Matt and Renard Cohen will show at Armory Center for the Arts. Actor/activist Mark Ruffalo has said of the film, “Besides the incredible information on fracking’s detriment to our health it is also a great look into what it is like to live in a town with fracking in the backyard. This film should be watched by everyone on the side of industry and those considering leasing their land to the gas companies. Plain and simply, it’s the human side of this debate.”

A community discussion follows the film. The Armory is located at 145 N. Raymond in Old Pasadena. Admission is free and the facility is accessible to disabled persons.

A Sustainable Future for the Amazon?

February 16, 2015

sharkposter-230x349This month’s Conscientious Projector selection, Shark Loves the Amazon, takes us to the Amazon for a look at what it will take to protect the world’s largest but endangered rainforest and support the millions of people who now live there.  The film will show on Thursday, March 12, 7:00 p.m. at Armory Center for the Arts. 

Many still think of the Amazon as a land populated primarily by indigenous people surrounded by exotic flora and fauna, but that’s no longer a fully accurate picture. More than twenty million Brazilians have migrated there in recent decades and are themselves struggling to survive amidst modern challenges presented by deforestation, the free market economy, climate change and the loss of biodiversity. Author Mark London (The Last Forest: The Amazon in the Age of Globalization, written with journalist Brian Kelly) offers an updated analysis and a vision for a sustainable future for the region. NOTE: The “Shark” mentioned in the title refers to Mark, who is also an attorney.

A community discussion follows the film. The Armory is located at 145 N. Raymond in Old Pasadena. Admission is free and the facility is accessible to disabled persons.

Healing the Traumatized Mind

January 15, 2015

postersmall_free-the-mindJoin us on Thursday, February 12, 7:00 p.m. at Armory Center for the Arts for Director Phie Ambo’s stirring, beautifully crafted 2013 film, Free the Mind.  Can meditation, yoga, mindfulness and compassion play a pivotal role in treating childhood trauma, ADHD and PTSD? The pioneering work of University of Wisconsin psychologist Richard Davidson has shown that these contemplative practices can indeed aid in the healing of the human psyche and the restoring of emotional and psychological well-being. One of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of 2006, Davidson and the stories of three of his patients are featured in Free the Mind, which follows a 5-year-old boy suffering from severe anxiety and two traumatized Iraq war veterans on their journey through life-changing experiments delving into the deepest recesses of the human mind.

Clinical psychologist Rev. Dr. Sally Howard will facilitate a community discussion following the film. The Armory is located at 145 N. Raymond in Old Pasadena. Admission is free and the facility is accessible to disabled persons.

Responding to Climate Change: Innovation in Bangladesh

December 14, 2014

362199_300x300Join us on Thurs., January 8 at 7:00 p.m. for producer-director Glenn Baker’s Sundance Institute Award-winning documentary Easy Like Water.  One of the major injustices of climate change is that many of the world’s under-developed nations are facing its greatest threats, while their citizens bear little responsibility for its causes and impact. Bangladesh, the eighth most populous nation in the world, is a salient case in point. 20% of its land may be washed away by 2050 from rising sea levels and melting glaciers due to increasing greenhouse gas emissions. 100,000 Bangladeshis are already being displaced each year. So it is both ironic and heartening that some of the most innovative, design-based climate change solutions are coming from this beleaguered country. Easy Like Water focuses on visionary architect Mohammed Rezwan’s project to replace flood-ravaged schools with solar-powered floating classrooms built on repurposed surplus boats, a model that Rezwan intends to expand to create floating health clinics, shelters, libraries and cinemas.

A community discussion follows the film. The Armory is located at 145 N. Raymond in Old Pasadena. Admission is free and the facility is accessible to disabled persons.

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